About Us



CITIES

Rhea County consists of three major cities: Dayton, Spring City, and Graysville. Our unincorporated communities include Evensville, Frazier, Grandview, and Old Washington.

GOVERNMENT

Rhea County uses the county commission form of local government. Our current county executive is George Thacker. There are nine seats on the county commission, each representing a geographical area of the county. Members of the commission and the county mayor are elected to four-year terms.

SCHOOLS

The county-administered public school system serves most Rhea County students. The system operates three elementary schools, two middle schools, two K-8 schools, one high school, and one alternative school.

Public Elementary and Secondary Schools:

Public High School:

Private Schools: K-8

HISTORY

Rhea County is named for the Tennessee politician and Revolutionary War Revolutionary War veteran, John Rhea. A portion of the Trail of Tears ran through the county as part of the United States government's removal of the Cherokee in the 1830s. During the American Civil War, Rhea County was one of the few counties in East Tennessee that was heavily sympathetic to the cause of the Confederate States of America. It was the only East Tennessee County that refused to send a delegate to the East Tennessee Convention of 1861. Rhea raised seven companies for the Confederate Army, compared to just one company for the Union.

Rhea had the only female cavalry company on either side during the Civil War. It was made up of young women in their teens and twenties from Rhea County and was formed in 1862. The girls named their unit the Rhea County Spartans. Until 1863, the Spartans simply visited loved ones in the military and delivered the equivalent of modern day care packages. After Union troops entered Rhea in 1863, the Spartans may have engaged in some spying for Confederate Forces. The members of the Spartans were arrested in April 1865 under orders of a Rhea County Unionist and were forced to march to the Tennessee River. From there they were transported to Chattanooga aboard the USS Chattanooga. Once in Chattanooga, Union officers realized the women were not a threat and ordered them released and returned to Rhea County. They first were required to take the oath of allegiance to the United States government. The Spartans were not an officially recognized unit of the Confederate Army.

The Scopes Trial, which resulted from the teaching of evolution being banned in Tennessee public schools under the Butler Act, took place in Rhea County in 1925. The Scopes Trial was one of the first to be referred to as the Trial of the century. William Jennings Bryan played a role as prosecutor in trial, and he died in Dayton shortly after the trial ended. A statue of Bryan was recently erected on the grounds of the Rhea County Courthouse. In 1954 the laws were changed to allow teaching of evolution alongside Bible studies in school. On June 8, 2004, a federal appeals court upheld a ruling banning further Bible instructions as a violation of the First Amendment principle of "Separation of church and state".

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